Social confusion in Autism

Social confusion in Autism

Abstract

It is impossible to observe a social interaction, or a social impairment, in a person who is alone. Regardless, the phrase social impairment in autism is frequently used to refer to the social challenges associated with disorders identified by Leo Kanner (1943) and Hans Asperger (1944). The words in autism in this case may leave a misleading impression that the social impairment lies solely within the individual with autism. This is inconsistent with the definition of the word social, which requires the involvement of more than one person. Firsthand accounts by people with autism (e.g., Cesaroni & Garber, 1991; Grandin & Scariano, 1986; Volkmar & Cohen, 1985; Williams, 1992), and families of individuals with autism (Hart, 1989; McDonnell, 1993; Moreno, 1992) raise awareness of the frustrations experienced by all parties as they work to understand, communicate, and interact successfully with one another. Confusion and feelings of being overwhelmed and misunderstood are experienced not only by people with high-functioning autism and Asperger syndrome (HFA/AS), but also by parents, professionals, and friends.

Asperger Syndrome or High-Functioning Autism? by Carol A. Gray

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I also found the following presentation very helpful.

Social Cognition: Cognitive processes behind social competency

Much of the social struggles that people on the spectrum experience are related to the differences in the way they process information. This presentation explores the different cognitive processes that are important in relating with others, explains why is it so difficult for them to socially fit in, and provides some strategies for helping them learn to navigate our social world.

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These images spoke very loudly to me as an Adult Aspie.

Also as a Mom with ASD children.

And a daughter to an Autistic Dad.

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3 thoughts on “Social confusion in Autism

  1. Pingback: Change is good when God prompts it. « Alienhippy's Blog

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